Rob Bevan

Rhubarb Rhubarb

1 minute read Published:

The Hungarian composer Antal Borsos (1916-1979) was known for works of a traditional nature until the early 1960s, when he began to dabble with the avant garde. He was particularly interested in incorporating organic noises and envisioned a symphony developed from the ‘music’ produced by plants (creaking trees, snapping buds etc). His Fugue in C major (No.50) used a recording he made of rhubarb growing inside metal bins (forced rhubarb famously grows so quickly that it can be heard expanding).

"It was while I was taking care of the horses that I got in contact with the angels", she says

1 minute read Published:

Norway's Princess Martha Louise says she has psychic powers and can teach people to communicate with angels. “It was while I was taking care of the horses that I got in contact with the angels,” she says. Norway princess 'talks to angels'

Marimekko fabrics on Thinglink

1 minute read Published:

Marimekko fabrics on Thinglink

Building Open Library, we faced a difficult new technical problem

1 minute read Published:

Building Open Library, we faced a difficult new technical problem. We wanted a database that could hold tens of millions of records, that would allow random users to modify its entries and keep a full history of their changes, and that would hold arbitrary semi-structured data as users added it. Each of these problems had been solved on its own, but nobody had yet built a technology that solved all three together.

My Private Sky

1 minute read Published:

When a buyer orders his set of plates he gives his date and place of birth. The buyer’s personal night sky map is then calculated by a custom computer program and printed onto a set of blueprints followed by Nymphenburg’s master porcelain painters. Each set of dinner plates involves the hand-painting of some 500 stars, nebulae, planets and constellations in gold and platinum. Press Release: My Private Sky

Phone a glacier in Iceland

1 minute read Published:

A unique work of art, unveiled today, invites viewers to phone a glacier in Iceland - and listen to its death throes, live, through a microphone submerged deep in the bitterly cold lagoon which relays the splashes, creaks and groans as great masses of melting ice sheer off and crash into the water. The Guardian: Callers take part in art

The Mended Spiderweb series

1 minute read Published:

Mended Spiderweb #19 (Laundry Line) Nina Katchadourian: The Mended Spiderweb series

Dr. Strangelove Dr. Strangelove

1 minute read Published:

In Dr. Strangelove Dr. Strangelove, Kristan Horton imitates the satirical movie Dr. Strangelove and creates a new world for the film—silverware become an airplane, plastic and coffee grounds become the sky. Dr. Strangelove Dr. Strangelove

An Interview with Walter Murch

2 minute read Published:

There are little hints of underlying cinematic structures now and then. For instance: to make a convincing action sequence requires, on average, fourteen different camera angles a minute. I don’t mean fourteen cuts – you can have many more than fourteen cuts per minute – but fourteen new views. Let’s say there is a one-minute action scene with thirty cuts, so that the average length of each is two seconds – but, of those thirty cuts, sixteen of them will be repeats of a previous camera angle.

Urban skiing is taking off in Britain

1 minute read Published:

You can hear the shout of outrage from an attendant at Angel station as the young Norwegian casually straps on his skis and begins a terrifying descent of the London tube network's highest escalator with a camera strapped to his head. What London Underground called a "dangerous, stupid and irresponsible" stunt has, predictably, become the latest YouTube sensation, generating 2,000 views every hour yesterday. The skier, a publicity-shy Norwegian in his 20s, whom friends say is called Arild, hurtles down the 90-metre up escalator in north London, skidding safely to a halt at the bottom to the applause of passersby.

Create a Moon/Golf/Bowie image before Xmas and win an iPod Shuffle

1 minute read Published:

To celebrate the success of the PlayTime event and continue Tim Wright’s mission to play golf on the moon (with David Bowie), XPT is offering a iPod Shuffle to the person who comes up with the best photographic simulation of a particular aspect of the the 30-year plan. By concretising events and situations in a series of manipulated images, we are making the whole project more real, more achievable. Simulation=Solution.